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Let's play in the dirt! For The Love Of Garden is a group for people who love to garden or who love to dream about gardens.... Lets share design ideas, tips and links to our favorite garden sites. Seeds, flowers, trees, tools, eco-solutions and recourses of all kinds!

Lovely Little Vignettes: JolieElise's Jasmine Arch

Posted By Casa Community on Jul 20, 2010 at 8:00AM

Here's a post from CasaSugar Community member JolieElise from the Lovely Little Vignettes group:

I'm just as likely to create a vignette outdoors and indoors. I trained jasmine over the cast-off iron from the bottom of a spiral staircase. When she's in bloom, she's stunning!


I've added the large vase and love the lines here.

Have you created any indoor or outdoor vignettes? Be sure to post photos and tales in the Lovely Little Vignettes group!

Casa Verde: Break Up the Terra Cotta

Posted By Home on Jun 7, 2010 at 10:00AM

They may know how to grow the lushest shrubs, but even green thumbs are known to break a pot every now and then. When a terra cotta pot bites the dust, don't toss it in the trash. Take the shards and turn them into something useful. Break the bits into small pieces (carefully of course!) and add them to the bottom of other planters. The broken shards will help with drainage and keep plants perfectly moisturized!

Source: Flickr user englishsnow

Casa Verde: Break Up the Terra Cotta

Posted By Home on Jun 7, 2010 at 10:00AM

They may know how to grow the lushest shrubs, but even green thumbs are known to break a pot every now and then. When a terra cotta pot bites the dust, don't toss it in the trash. Take the shards and turn them into something useful. Break the bits into small pieces (carefully of course!) and add them to the bottom of other planters. The broken shards will help with drainage and keep plants perfectly moisturized!

Source: Flickr user englishsnow

Garden Therapy: Avoid the Great Mint Takeover

Posted By Home on May 18, 2010 at 1:00PM

Mint is a great herb for novice gardeners because it's incredibly hardy and very easy to care for. Planters beware though, mint is terribly invasive and, if allowed, will take over your entire garden in no time. A while back, I made the mistake of planting mint in a raised bed, which quickly and unfortunately became my bed of mint. Years later, even after I've ripped it all out, more mint seems to miraculously sprout from the ground. So no matter how much you love Mojitos, unless you have a large spot where mint can spread vigorously without disturbing other plants in your garden, it's best to plant the herb in a container by itself. It'll fill the pot quickly and you can enjoy fresh mint all summer long.

Garden Water Fountains

Posted By myfirstname on May 10, 2010 at 5:54PM
exaltedfountains.com

Casa Beta: Hydro-Mats

Posted By Home on May 4, 2010 at 3:00PM

How does your garden grow? At one point mine was dying (literally) of thirst, so I searched for a solution to keep my planters, pots, and hanging baskets drought-resistant. A friend told me that Hydro-Mats ($10 for eight 7 inch x 7 inch mats) are the only way her arid garden in Denver stays lush, so I decided to give it a try. Basically Hydro-Mats are small pieces of poly-spun fabric with polymer crystals that you put in the bottom of your planters. Each mat holds a quart of water, which it releases slowly, reducing your watering time dramatically. To see if the mats met my expectations, just read more

Sometimes an Herb Garden Is Just an Herb Garden

Posted By OnSugar Blog on Apr 28, 2010 at 11:00AM

Here's a post from OnSugar blog Suburban Zen:

By coincidence, I've received copies of the NY Times article "The Femivore's Dilemma" from three different people recently. It seems my status as a working mother, pescetarian, Farmer's Market shopper, composter, and farmer in our suburban backyard garden makes me a likely candidate for this new movement of self-sustaining feminists who not only serve their families organic food, but feel compelled to grow and harvest it themselves.

While I admire the women who have the time and fortitude to raise their own chickens, grow all their food, and take up beekeeping as a hobby, I just don't have the time at this stage in my life. The truth is, we grow tomatoes, peppers, and herbs in our backyard because Katie likes to help tend the garden and it gives us another good reason to be outside with our children. We shop at our local Farmer's Market because it's a fun thing to do on a Saturday morning and we live in glorious Northern California where the Farmer's Market produce is beautiful and delicious. We compost because we can and should, but truthfully, we haven't quite gotten the hang of it yet. We have fresh limes in our margaritas during the summer because the lime tree came with the house. The good things we do, we do because they fit within our lifestyle today.

I hope that someday I'll be able to indulge in a more rural lifestyle. In fact I have dreams of living like Tim and Karen Bates of the Philo Apple Farm. But for now, the herb garden is just an herb garden.

Want to see more? Start following Suburban Zen or start your own OnSugar blog!

How-To: Start a Spring Wildflower Garden

Posted By Home on Apr 21, 2010 at 1:30PM

If you're planning on adding some wildflowers to your Spring gardening, I have some tips to get you started.

  • If you're starting your wildflower garden on an area that's already grassy or full of unwanted plants, you can kill the plants by putting down about six to eight layers of wet newspaper. After a month to a month and a half, you'll have a weed- and grass-free area to plant seeds or seedlings upon. You can shred the newspaper to use as mulch (it's good for your soil), or, you can compost it.
  • If you're planting a small area, you can use seedlings instead of seeds.
  • Make sure to sow your seeds when danger of frost is past.

For more hints, just read more

How-To: Start a Spring Wildflower Garden

Posted By Home on Apr 21, 2010 at 1:30PM

If you're planning on adding some wildflowers to your Spring gardening, I have some tips to get you started.

  • If you're starting your wildflower garden on an area that's already grassy or full of unwanted plants, you can kill the plants by putting down about six to eight layers of wet newspaper. After a month to a month and a half, you'll have a weed- and grass-free area to plant seeds or seedlings upon. You can shred the newspaper to use as mulch (it's good for your soil), or, you can compost it.
  • If you're planting a small area, you can use seedlings instead of seeds.
  • Make sure to sow your seeds when danger of frost is past.

For more hints, just read more

Name This Flower

Posted By Home on Mar 31, 2010 at 7:00AM

I have a serious weakness for all flowers, but I've narrowed it down to two favorites. One of them is the tulip, which is a bulbous plant, understated, and charming. The other is a very different species: a showier, more ostentatious bloom with a wealth of petals. So when I came across this variety of tulip, which looks like a hybrid of my two faves, I nearly died and went to heaven. It's called a ______-flowering tulip, named for my other favorite bloom. Can you guess what the other flower is?

Name This Flower